Wednesday was hard

Wednesday was cold and wet. And dark. I turned on the light in my attic office first thing and didn’t turn it off until I felt it was bright enough, somewhere around 11:30. At 2:30 I turned it back on again as it seemed to be getting dark. I was at my desk all day, …

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Going quietly mad

I was in the garden today when I asked myself, “How long have I been looking at this onion for?” I have never planted onions before and I am intrigued by how they grow. I am also a little concerned because they are not as big as my Dad’s onions. I may have onion-envy. I …

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Let’s get (serious about) NI moving again

This week the DUP published a twelve-point plan to ‘get NI moving’. It was an upbeat document, focussing on the NHS, the economy, education, protecting the vulnerable, the environment, reducing crime, even protecting animals got a mention; in many respects they’ve come a long way from ‘Ulster Says No’. There was no mention of Brexit, …

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Review: Considering Grace – Presbyterians and the Troubles

'Considering Grace: Presbyterians and the Troubles' is comprised of over one hundred Presbyterians’ experiences of the Troubles. While it was overseen by a committee of the Presbyterian Church, this is a book of grass roots stories, and demonstrates what a 'broad church’ the denomination really is. No one group of interviewees -ministers, victims, members of …

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My ‘freelanciversary’: the mistake I made

The start of September marks my ‘freelanciversary’. I left teaching in 2017 to allow space for other things, not least to give more attention to creating better ways to develop diversity and mutual understanding in the classroom. Over the last couple of years, I have worked with groups, and on projects and resources to enable …

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The cycle isn’t going to break itself

In the wake of Lyra McKee’s death, there were immediate calls for an end to violence; Arlene Foster and Michelle O’Neill were both quick to condemn the taking of life. But I am fearful we are in a similar cycle to the US gun debate: A massacre takes place. There is national mourning. There is impassioned debate, …

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